AU
Australian Threatened Species: Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo

Australian Threatened Species: Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo

Populations of the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo have more than halved in the past 45 years and extinction threatens this beautiful creature due to the loss and fragmentation of its habitat in Southwest Australia, along with habitat competition from introduced/feral bees.  European bees are 'stealing' hollow logs for hives and due to the concern surrounding global declining bee populations, there is no way for the Department of Parks and Wildlife to remove them from hollows and allow the cockatoos a chance to nest.

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo is an impressive bird with its white tail panel and cream-coloured cheeks - growing up to 60cm in height. A playful and highly social bird, often found in small flocks in the Wheatbelt of WA and the Swan Coastal Plain.  The species can live for 40-50 years and begin to breed at 4 years of age.  When they mate - they are coupled for life. 

We actively support the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and their work to restore the breeding and feeding habitat of the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo.  WWF is supporting Birdlife Australia to help protect Carnaby's habitat through the construction of fences, nesting boxes and planting cockatoo food trees such as banksias, hakea and grevillea.

Portrait of ‘Kirra’ the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo by photographer Leila Jeffreys.

Carnaby's Black Cockatoo